Tuesday, 26 February 2013

Newspapers - Putting the Meat on the Bones of Family History


A few transcripts from Worcester newspapers to give a flavour of the wealth of information that can be found in newspapers.    Information like this certainly adds the meat to the bones of any family tree. 

Given the rarity of the name Mottram in Worcester, England, I suspect that Moses (an established bad character) is 'one of mine'.  I just need to do some research now to prove or disprove it.

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Worcestershire Chronicle
Wednesday, 25 March 1846

WEDNESDAY (TO-DAY)

MR. ROWLAND'S ROBBERY – Moses Mottram, an established bad character, was to-day brought up on remand, charged with having been engaged in the late robbery from the office of Mr. Rowland's timber-yard, near the bridge. It will be remembered that another notorious character, Wm. Henry Young, has also been in custody on the same charge. Mottram was captured last week by Sargeant Sanders, who had successfully pursued him as far as Monmouth Cap. The examination was going on when we went to press.
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Worcester Journal
Thursday, 4 June 1846

The following convicts were removed on Saturday from our city gaol to Milbank prison, preparatory to undergoing the respective terms of transportation to which they were sentenced at our last Sessions :- Thomas Williams, 7 years; George Hunt, 7 years; Moses Mottram, 10 years; William Henry Young, 10 years.
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Worcester Journal
Thursday, 12 May 1853

UNLAWFULLY SELLING SPIRITS – Mr Joseph Bromfield, landlord of the Union Tavern, was cited for having sold a quantity of gin, before half-past twelve o'clock, on Sunday, the lst inst., contrary to the law. A woman, named Crump, stated that on the morning of the above day she was at the back-door of Bromfield's house, with a man named Mottram. He asked her to have something to drink, and went up the passage, and soon returned with some gin in a half-pint cup. It was about nine o'clock in the morning. She did not see him pay anything for it. She became tipsy, and was taken to the Station-house. - Moses Mottram said he was a shoeing smith, living at Severn Stoke. He saw the last witness in a yard in Watercourse Alley, near the Union Inn, on the day named, sometime in the morning. He asked her to have something to drink, and went back to his mother's house, in the Alley, and fetched her some gin, which he had had from Bromfield's the previous night. He swore he never fetched any gin from defendant's on Sunday morning. - Mr Bromfield, in defence, said that he knew nothing at all of the transaction; but Smith, one of the Mayor's officers, on asking permission to make a remark, said that when he served Mr. Bromfield with the summons, he said “be should get out of it,” on account of the man being a “traveller;” he had the gin, but he (Mr. Bromfield) was up stairs. - Mr. Sidebottom said that he perceived, on reference, that defendant had been convicted once before of a like offence, on the 19th October, 1849, and had been fined £1. 14s. He certainly should have thought that would have been a warning. In this instance, whatever the private opinion of the Bench might be, the evidence was not strong enough to convict, and therefore the case must be dismissed.
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Worcester Journal
Saturday, 29 July 1854
Tuesday.
Before C. Sidebottom and E. Evans, Esqrs.

ASSAULT. - James Male charged a man named Moses Mottram, with having committed an assault upon him on Sunday evening last, near Canalside. The charge was proved, and defendant was fined 5s. and 8s. 6d. Expenses, or seven days' imprisonment. Allowed a week to find the money.
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Worcester Journal
Saturday, 9 February 1856

A WIFE BEATER. - Moses Mottram appeared to answer the charge of assaulting and threatening the life of his wife, a respectably dressed young woman, on the previous day. It appeared from the woman's statement that the defendant was in the habit of leaving his home periodically on a “drinking bout,” and returning at the end of his sojourn and beating his wife and her parents, as well as using most disgusting language. Yesterday (Sunday) morning he went home in a beastly state of intoxication, and beat his wife in a shocking manner. The woman now requested the Magistrates to order the defendant to allow her a weekly sum for the support of the child she had in her arms. Defendant admitted getting a “drop of beer,” but denied ever striking or threatening his wife, and said he was ready to come to any terms for her support the Bench might think fit. On being asked if he would allow his wife 5s. per week, he at once consented, and said he would leave the money with Supt. Chipp every week. The Bench adjourned the case for a month, to ascertain if defendant was inclined to fulfil his promise.
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Worcestershire Chronicle
Wednesday, 14 January 1857

Friday
THREATENING A WIFE. - Moses Mottram, who three months since was committed to hard labour for ill-using his wife, and has just completed his term of imprisonment, was brought up on the charge of threatening to murder his wife and child and also her father and mother. He had made these threats in gaol, but now said he was sorry for what had taken place. The wife insisted upon his being bound over, declared she could not live with him again, and exhibited so much violence in language and manner as to induce the magistrates to think that the couple would live more happily apart than as members of one household, and they advised the husband to make her an allowance. This he consented to do, and said he would give her 5s. per week for the maintenance of herself and child. She agreed to take that sum, and the business was settled by his entering into his own recognizances for 20/. to keep the peace for twelve months.
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These articles were found via www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk

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